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ESGI49
29/03 - 02/04/04 OCIAM Oxford University
OCIAM

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About Study Groups

The ESGI (European Study Group with Industry) is Europe's leading workshop for interaction between mathematicians and industry.

These week-long workshops have been held annually since 1968 (originally as the Oxford Study Groups with Industry) and attract leading mathematicians to work on industrial (in a broad sense) problems. The European Study Groups with Industry are organized by different universities in Europe and similar weeks have been organised in Australia (MISG), the States (RPI Workshop) and other countries.

Research workers from industrial and commercial concerns are invited to present one of their current technical problems for study in working sessions with leading specialists from the academic community. Problems may come from a wide variety of subject areas, but should be amenable to mathematical modelling and analysis. In a week of brainstorming and mathematical modelling there is usually enough time to generate and reject many ideas for solving the problem, and usually some of the ideas are checked in more detail. A full report of the Study Group's work on the problem is produced after the meeting. Further research may also be generated, for which the Study Group has already introduced the company to interested academics.

In the past, problem areas have included processes amenable to modelling by continuum mechanics, for instance involving heat and mass transfer, fluid flow, granular materials, electric fields, ranging to financial-derivative pricing, and housing strategies, but in principal there are no limitations to the types of mathematics used, or problem areas to be tackled, by these workshops.

They have also served to establish links between university mathematics departments and industry.

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This page last modified by D. Mortimer
Tuesday, 23-Sep-2003 12:15:49 BST
Email corrections and comments to mortimer@maths.ox.ac.uk